For Brigid

I was blessed this past Christmas break to stand as godfather for my cousin Brigid’s baptism. I vividly remember meeting her for the first time when I got home from college, and holding her as she slept. The moment was so precious, the image of me holding her still stands as my profile picture on facebook and the background to my phone. Cradling her in my arms, I couldn’t think straight, overwhelmed by how precious she was, only managing to barely whisper, “She’s so beautiful.”

Only yesterday I participated with hundreds of thousands of others in the National March for Life in Washington, D.C. I was excited to be there with friends and fellow pilgrims who know and believe, as I do, that all life is not only beautiful but sacred, and well worth fighting to save. But for me, the time was more solemn. I thought of little Brigid, wrapped in her blanket, asleep in my arms, and thought, “How could anyone choose to destroy something so precious?” The thought of her not existing brought tears to my eyes.

For those who do not agree, I would challenge you to hold a sleeping baby in your arms, even if just for a few moments, to look at their peaceful, precious face. Then look at a pregnant woman and realize that that mother is holding a little soul, much like the one you’re holding now, in her womb; that her so-called choice snuffs out that beautiful little life, utterly destroys it. It is little wonder that so many mothers and fathers who choose abortion deal with great emotional trauma, and I pray deeply for their healing.

For those who do agree, but may be growing tired or losing hope, have courage. It was Dostoevsky who said “Beauty will save the world”, and what happened at the March was profoundly beautiful. In our prayer and sacrifice we reached out to legislators, doctors, mothers, fathers, and all who do not agree or who have been deeply hurt by abortions. If only one doctor second-guesses his abortive practices; if only one legislator stops to consider the sanctity of life; if only one mother or father chooses to keep the child or put it up for adoption; if only one precious child is saved as a result of our efforts, all that we have done will be well worth it for the saving of that one soul.

My fellow pilgrims, not one of us would be here if our parents had not said “Yes” to God’s incredible and beautiful gift of life. Will we deny to others this precious gift, or stand idly by as it is taken away? Or for the love of God, life, and beauty, will we fight til our dying breath to protect the unborn?

Posted on January 26, 2013, in Insights and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

The Window Philosopher

Reflections from the edge of adulthood.

dum spiro, spero.

public notes to myself for the benefit of many

A Tangled Mass

"I am a little pencil in the hand of a writing God, who is sending a love letter to the world." - Bl. Mother Teresa

The Soul of Rock n' Roll

Rebelling against going with the flow...Tradition, novelty, and classical wisdom with a dose of all things Rock!

Bob Rice

Catholic speaker, musician, author, teacher

Not the Ends

when i can't keep my thoughts inside my head

Behold Your Beauty

finding beauty in every day life

Earnest Attempts

Just a young Catholic poet wanting to share his perspectives with the world.

Armads and Elendil

“I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend.” ~J.R.R. Tolkien

Eärendil Star

One blog to rule them all. One blog to find them. One blog to bring them all, and in the light, bind them.

The Cultured Catholic

In the world, but not of the world. Cultured, yet counter-cultural. The Christian paradox.

Prayers and Promises

Finding Hope in This Crazy World

%d bloggers like this: